Young Designer Who Doesn’t Draw Wins Red Dot Design Award

by | Dec 23, 2019 | #design

Meet Pallas Wong, the Goldsmiths graduate whose socially driven interactive colour perception test saw off competition from industry giants

A young designer has won the internationally renowned Red Dot Design Award for a social campaign centred on an interactive colour perception test, beating some of the world’s largest multinationals to take the coveted prize.

Hong Kong-born and UK-raised Pallas (Long Hei) Wong, 23, won the prestigious award, which attracted 8,697 entries from around the world, in Berlin recently.

Only 72 submissions were bestowed with a ‘Red Dot: Best of the Best’ award, representing less than 0.8 per cent of the overall pool of entries.

A Goldsmiths, University of London student, Wong competed under his own name against industry giants such as Huawei, LG Electronics, and Philips, winning both the ‘Junior Prize’ and the ‘Best of the Best’ award.

Unusually for a designer, Wong doesn’t draw; instead, he is making a name for himself with his design concepts and direction in the fields of humanity and social change, with a focus on raising awareness of important social topics.

Wong’s winning entry, ‘The Hardest Colour-blind Test’, was a social campaign centred on an interactive colour perception test, which took place at the London Lumiere Light Festival.

Visitors to the event were asked to identify a number in a densely dotted image, with over 92 per cent failing to do so. The specially designed, reversed colour-blind test can only be correctly answered by people with a colour vision deficiency.

According to the National Health Service, it is a sight defect that occurs in one in every 12 people globally and is mostly a hereditary condition.

The aim of Wong’s campaign was to raise awareness of colour vision deficiency because it is a disability that can lead to serious accidents in everyday life but is underestimated and disregarded by societies around the world.

More than one million passers-by experienced Wong’s optical illusion, which was based on the Ishihara colour perception test but presented with a colour plate that is expertly and precisely inverted.

Wong has had to deal with adversity in his personal life and says he is on a mission to help others.

Born Long Hei, before renaming himself Pallas, the designer has suffered from bipolar disorder for many years.

“Pallas is a name derived from the Greek mythology; he shielded his troops in battle to victory. Although mythological in origin, I want to apply it literally to myself – I want to protect and guide individuals as their shield and create a better society.”

After completing a bachelor’s degree at Goldsmiths, Wong was offered a full postgraduate scholarship. However, he declined it to pursue a career as the creative force for brands such as Gillette and celebrities including Cristiano Ronaldo.

Wong comments, “I want to make good use of my talents and contribute myself to social and charitable work, especially helping brands for their corporate social responsibility designs.

“Since I am determined to fulfil this goal, then what is better than studying and turning my wish into reality at the same time?”

 “Designers have the ability and responsibility to design brilliant and meaningful work for spectators to rethink important subjects. This is the primary essence of design: to create a better world, with strong aesthetics and direction. This, in my opinion, is the true path for young designers.”

Pallas Wong / pallas.xyz

Young Designer Who Doesn’t Draw Wins Red Dot Design Award

by | Dec 23, 2019 | #design

Meet Pallas Wong, the Goldsmiths graduate whose socially driven interactive colour perception test saw off competition from industry giants

A young designer has won the internationally renowned Red Dot Design Award for a social campaign centred on an interactive colour perception test, beating some of the world’s largest multinationals to take the coveted prize.

Hong Kong-born and UK-raised Pallas (Long Hei) Wong, 23, won the prestigious award, which attracted 8,697 entries from around the world, in Berlin recently.

Only 72 submissions were bestowed with a ‘Red Dot: Best of the Best’ award, representing less than 0.8 per cent of the overall pool of entries.

A Goldsmiths, University of London student, Wong competed under his own name against industry giants such as Huawei, LG Electronics, and Philips, winning both the ‘Junior Prize’ and the ‘Best of the Best’ award.

Unusually for a designer, Wong doesn’t draw; instead, he is making a name for himself with his design concepts and direction in the fields of humanity and social change, with a focus on raising awareness of important social topics.

Wong’s winning entry, ‘The Hardest Colour-blind Test’, was a social campaign centred on an interactive colour perception test, which took place at the London Lumiere Light Festival.

Visitors to the event were asked to identify a number in a densely dotted image, with over 92 per cent failing to do so. The specially designed, reversed colour-blind test can only be correctly answered by people with a colour vision deficiency.

According to the National Health Service, it is a sight defect that occurs in one in every 12 people globally and is mostly a hereditary condition.

The aim of Wong’s campaign was to raise awareness of colour vision deficiency because it is a disability that can lead to serious accidents in everyday life but is underestimated and disregarded by societies around the world.

More than one million passers-by experienced Wong’s optical illusion, which was based on the Ishihara colour perception test but presented with a colour plate that is expertly and precisely inverted.

Wong has had to deal with adversity in his personal life and says he is on a mission to help others.

Born Long Hei, before renaming himself Pallas, the designer has suffered from bipolar disorder for many years.

“Pallas is a name derived from the Greek mythology; he shielded his troops in battle to victory. Although mythological in origin, I want to apply it literally to myself – I want to protect and guide individuals as their shield and create a better society.”

After completing a bachelor’s degree at Goldsmiths, Wong was offered a full postgraduate scholarship. However, he declined it to pursue a career as the creative force for brands such as Gillette and celebrities including Cristiano Ronaldo.

Wong comments, “I want to make good use of my talents and contribute myself to social and charitable work, especially helping brands for their corporate social responsibility designs.

“Since I am determined to fulfil this goal, then what is better than studying and turning my wish into reality at the same time?”

 “Designers have the ability and responsibility to design brilliant and meaningful work for spectators to rethink important subjects. This is the primary essence of design: to create a better world, with strong aesthetics and direction. This, in my opinion, is the true path for young designers.”

Pallas Wong / pallas.xyz

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