Learning Curve

by | Oct 18, 2019 | #kitchens

As the KBB industry faces the threat of a widening skills gap, the need for a more heavily regulated training structure that results in nationally recognised, standardised qualifications has become increasingly evident, writes Stacey Sheppard

When Renee Mascari was first appointed as CEO of the Kitchens Bedrooms Bathrooms National Training Group (KBBNTG) back in 2004, it was clear that the industry was suffering from a skills shortage primarily in design and installation. Mascari was charged with exploring the range of applicable qualifications that were available and if any colleges were delivering industry specific courses. 

What quickly became apparent was the distinct lack of a clear professional pathway for those looking to work in the KBB industry. Mascari says: “Until now, that has always been my biggest worry. We should be promoting our industry to schools and colleges as a career choice, but if we do that, where is the pathway and where are the colleges to deliver the training? There are a lot of courses on the shelves for management, sales and customer care, business studies etc but up until now there has been no direct pathway for learners to become qualified kitchen, bedroom, or bathroom designers or installers.”

With Mascari at its helm, the KBBNTG worked to combat the identified skills shortage within the KBB sector by working in partnership with a variety of organisations to develop training and educational programs for the industry. “The KBB industry requires professionals and we therefore have a duty of care to ensure that as an industry we are able to deliver industry specific education,” explains Mascari. “It is the only way to reduce the skills gap we currently face. To do that we have to invest in an education structure capable of developing qualifications, writing the programmes and schemes, sourcing the tutors, colleges and training providers to deliver them. What it boils down to is funding and commitment, without which those that have tried and those that are currently trying to support and promote education for the KBB industry will continue to fail.”

The KBBNTG sadly ran into financial difficulties and a lack of industry support was cited as the cause. Funding is obviously pivotal to the success of every organisation and whilst there were industry partners that loyally supported the NTG financially, such as The Kitchen Bathroom Bedroom Specialists Association (KBSA) and, for a period of time, the Construction Industry Training Board (CITB), Mascari says it was never enough to remain sustainable. “The volume of work required to facilitate, develop, promote and arrange delivery of courses is huge and needs to be paid for.”

Luckily, there are individuals in the industry who, unperturbed by the volume of work required, have stepped up to the plate and taken on the responsibility of forging a clear professional pathway for the industry. In 2014, working in cooperation with industry professionals, Bucks New University launched a new foundation degree course in kitchen design. The part-time course is delivered over three years and has been designed in response to national training needs.

Craig Matson, MD of Roundhouse Design, and Johnny Grey, Founder of Johnny Grey Studios spearheaded the efforts to pull this degree course together, calling on the help of other industry professionals to steer and deliver the training. It was a steep learning curve for all involved, explains Matson: “Education in this country has gone through a lot of changes and the system is still adapting to try to make courses more cost effective, as well as providing students with relevant degrees so that they can be usefully employed once they graduate. The standard of tutor input, the majority of which are from industry, is phenomenally high.”

The development of this degree course has been a hugely beneficial for the image and reputation of the kitchen industry with many welcoming the new framework for a specific, Government-approved, training structure that encourages professionalism.

“The kitchen industry has often been seen as the ‘used car salesman’ of the wider design industry,” says Matson. “In order to be seen as trusted advisors and professional partners, clients or their architects and interior designers need to know that we are professional, with training and expertise. With either government-approved apprenticeships or further education you get a standard that everyone understands and is consistent across the industry.”

Mascari wholeheartedly agrees with Matson on the need for nationally recognised, standardised qualifications. “We have to be responsible for the services we deliver and to that end we have to make sure that we understand good practice, adhere to current compliance etc. Education and Continuing Professional Development (CPD) will teach us that. It is far too risky to think we can just ‘wing’ our way through the job.” 

Grey is adamant that we need to establish a recognition that kitchen design is a profession and sits alongside its educational cousins: lighting design; interior design; product design; and architecture. Matson takes this one step further saying that in an ideal world he would like to see some sort of register, like the RIBA has, which requires CPD points. 

Whilst that may still be a long way off, Mascari believes that what has already been achieved with the degree course is worth celebrating. She says: “This takes kitchen design to a whole new level in terms of spatial design, in-depth research into products, technology, cultural and sustainable practices, such as the benefits of biophilic design and the impact it has on our wellbeing, not to mention our planet. The course also covers the important elements of running your business, project management, sales, customer care and marketing.” 

Whilst the benefits to industry are undeniable, it has not been an easy task to get all the bodies involved in ensuring its success to work together seamlessly. This gap was quickly noticed by Matson and Grey, along with David Gillett, sales and marketing director at Blum, who took it upon themselves to establish the Kitchen Education Trust (TKET), a charitable organisation that provides a link between the kitchen industry and education. TKET was set up in the first year the Foundation Degree in Kitchen Design started at Bucks New University. “It was needed because we were raising funds from the kitchen industry which initially went directly to the university,” says Matson. “However, we found that this did not work to the best effect so, we created TKET to be the intermediary between the education system and the industry, neither of which really understood how the other worked.”

However, Matson says that in order to pursue their goals they need more help from all sectors of the industry. Both Matson and Mascari were involved in the establishment of the Furniture and Interiors Education, Skills and Training Alliance (FIESTA) which unites the key trade associations and affiliates who represent the manufacturers in this sector. “I have always felt that the KBB should have some representation to government and as we fall within the furniture industry footprint, it makes complete sense that by taking a unilateral approach, we stand a much better chance of getting government support when we need it. FIESTA aims to do just that,” explains Mascari.

Whilst so much progress has been made in the past few years, there is still an underlying feeling that support from the wider KBB industry is not as forthcoming as it should be. Grey says that support has been variable, coming mostly from European companies who seem to understand more about the value of training and education. Matson highlights the support they have received from the likes of BSH, Miele, Franke, CD UK, Blanco, LDL, Blum, Cosentino, Decoglaze, Electrolux, Rotpunkt and Swift.

“Most levels in the industry get it,” assures Matson. “They think it’s a good idea, but getting them to translate that into financial support, which is predominantly what we need, is sometimes more difficult.”

For Grey, one of the main challenges is convincing the big players and the smaller retail businesses that they will benefit from educating their workforce. This has been clearly demonstrated by the poor uptake of installation apprenticeships. “Having developed the Fitted Furniture Installer Apprenticeship some 14 years ago and several reviews of the national occupational standards since then, the uptake has been terrible,” states Mascari.

“Our industry is crying out for qualified installers, there has been an apprenticeship available for some years and still we are not getting installation apprentices through our colleges. Colleges and training providers have been set up and are waiting for the uptake, but as we know, an apprentice needs to be employed by someone in order to take up an apprenticeship so why is our industry not doing just that? Hairdressers take on apprentices, manufacturers take on apprentices, so how can we complain that we have a skills shortage when we are not prepared to support and invest in an education programme?”

More recently, approval for the level 3 apprenticeship for the fitted furniture design technician has been approved and is now awaiting final government sign off. Once this apprenticeship is available, companies will be able to take on a kitchen design apprentice who can then go on to do the foundation degree course if they wished to take their studies further. The hope is that there will eventually be a BA and MA in kitchen design and a post-graduate research offering.

But none of this can achieved without the engagement of the industry. Matson says: “We need further assistance as we broaden the objectives of education and training for the industry, so I would urge all of those companies who have a great offering or product and are making a good living out of the industry, to consider their corporate responsibility and how they can help.”

Mascari sums it up nicely when she quotes American politician Brad Henry: “No other investment yields as great a return as the investment in education. An educated workforce is the foundation of every community and the future of every economy.”

Support Systems

As part of Blum’s corporate responsibility and commitment to improved professionalism within the industry, it offers a scholarship to cover part of the tuition fee cost to send a student on the Foundation Degree Course in Kitchen Design. Blum has offered a bursary since the first course started in 2014, and has supported a student every year since.

Originally, Blum sent one of its own employees, Thomas Winfield, on the three-year course. Having graduated in 2017, he now works at Blum’s UK headquarters in Milton Keynes. He says: “Completing the Kitchen Design Degree has really helped me with the work I do in the Blum Experience Centre, which is our dedicated consumer ‘test drive’ room.

Tom Winfield

“Being able to discuss with visitors their requirements in more detail, and to think differently in interpreting the space they have for their dream kitchen, has really elevated the customer experience. I really enjoyed the course, and being exposed to the many different sides of design thinking.”

However, Blum also has its own in-house, award-winning apprenticeship scheme. It was the first in Austria starting in 1959, and it is also one of the biggest with 384 people taking part as of September 2019. The course lasts three and a half to four years, depending on the chosen route, and apprentices will spend six months learning basic skills before being split into various high-tech career paths.

With a retention rate currently between 60-70%, the benefits for Blum are clear. Not only does the apprenticeship scheme provide a steady flow of high-skilled technicians and mechanics, it also ensures its long-term planning targets and the continuation of know-how and experience inside of the company.

A New Way of Learning

Gira is a supplier of intelligent system solutions for electronic, networked digital building control systems. Organisational knowledge sharing at Gira is achieved through the Gira Academy, which offers employees the opportunity to customise their own individualised training through face-to-face seminars, webinars and web-based training.

Mark Booth

Mark Booth, Managing Director Gira UK, says: “Ongoing learning is crucial for not falling behind. This is particularly true in the electrical and KBB sectors as contemporary methods, changing markets and new business fields and regulations make it necessary to constantly be up-to-date.”

Pledge of Allegiance

“Our main aim for pledging support to TKET is to help propel the kitchen industry into a true ‘profession of the highest integrity and competence’,” says Matt Phillips, Head of UK Operations for Rotpunkt. “We all know that kitchens are a multi-million pound global industry. It is therefore imperative for you to be able to maximise your share of that industry with a highly skilled and knowledgeable workforce able to understand your clients’ needs, design trends and technological developments.”

Matt Phillips, Head of UK Operations, Rotpunkt UK

He adds: “Additionally, skills shortages are putting significant pressure on the kitchen industry and TKET is successfully helping to maintain a high level of student enrolment and thus, market enrichment from the next generation of kitchen designers that will ultimately help to shape our future.”

“It is vital for our industry to work together and encourage fresh thinking that offers a new perspective and/or approach to kitchen design in general. We want our furniture to be ‘defined by difference’ so retailers and specifiers of Rotpunkt kitchens have the power of possibilities. This can only happen if we protect the entry level phase of our industry and the education of succeeding generations.”

On the Job Training

Chris Woodward is lead designer at Wren Kitchens but he had no experience in kitchen design before joining the company.  “I was manager of a bowling alley part-time whilst studying sports coaching at university,” says Woodward. “A friend of mine recommended a job at Wren based on the fact that I work well with customers. It seemed like a great opportunity as they offered on the job training. When I first joined, there was a week-long training programme which consisted of in-store training and online learning. Since I started there has been a continuous programme of learning and training. We have a lot of support in-house so if we ever have a skills shortage we can always find someone in-house to help with upskilling.”

Chris Woodward, Wren Kitchens

Conor Laville, Head of Training at Wren explains: “We always focus on the experience of the end user so it’s important that our staff are well educated in regulations because the impact that you could have on a customer’s home is substantial. We need to ensure that we pass all that experience, knowledge and training onto our designers. Training is essential to our business as we expand.”

Wren built its training academy in 2013. “We initially offered a one week course, which turned into a four week on-boarding programme and it is about to extend to a 6-12 month programme,” says Laville. “We are in the process of building more training centres around the UK so we can roll this out nationally to ensure we have the facilities to train our designers. Throughout their first year we also have a fantastic webinar programme to increase the access we offer to our training programmes.”

Vocational Training

“As someone who’s been through the apprentice career route first hand, I am an advocate of this process,” explains Paul Pickford, Director of Innovation, Product and Marketing at Aqualisa. “I started my apprenticeship in engineering at age 16 and embarked on a four year course that led on to a part-time degree. This blend of education and on the job training gave me a vital understanding of both the manufacturing process with hands-on training and the occupational elements of this career.

“Apprenticeships are crucial for amending the current skills shortage in the UK and introducing young people to the benefits a trade-based career can offer. Apprenticeships are a gateway to work with better potential for post-education employment than many other non-vocational routes.”

Paul Pickford – Aqualisa

Staff Scholarships

Over the last two years, Cosentino has provided one of its Elite Studios a 50% scholarship to send a member of staff on the award-winning foundation degree course in Kitchen Design at Bucks New University.

Paul Gidley, Cosentino UK, Area Director

Paul Gidley, Area Director for Cosentino UK, says: “At Cosentino, we are committed to supporting our industry and nurturing upcoming talent. We are delighted to be supporting individuals further their education and their careers through The Kitchen Education Trust with a 50% scholarship on the prestigious Bucks New University course. We are indebted to our loyal network of kitchen studios, and are happy to be able to give back when we can.”

Learning Curve

by | Oct 18, 2019 | #kitchens

As the KBB industry faces the threat of a widening skills gap, the need for a more heavily regulated training structure that results in nationally recognised, standardised qualifications has become increasingly evident, writes Stacey Sheppard

When Renee Mascari was first appointed as CEO of the Kitchens Bedrooms Bathrooms National Training Group (KBBNTG) back in 2004, it was clear that the industry was suffering from a skills shortage primarily in design and installation. Mascari was charged with exploring the range of applicable qualifications that were available and if any colleges were delivering industry specific courses. 

What quickly became apparent was the distinct lack of a clear professional pathway for those looking to work in the KBB industry. Mascari says: “Until now, that has always been my biggest worry. We should be promoting our industry to schools and colleges as a career choice, but if we do that, where is the pathway and where are the colleges to deliver the training? There are a lot of courses on the shelves for management, sales and customer care, business studies etc but up until now there has been no direct pathway for learners to become qualified kitchen, bedroom, or bathroom designers or installers.”

With Mascari at its helm, the KBBNTG worked to combat the identified skills shortage within the KBB sector by working in partnership with a variety of organisations to develop training and educational programs for the industry. “The KBB industry requires professionals and we therefore have a duty of care to ensure that as an industry we are able to deliver industry specific education,” explains Mascari. “It is the only way to reduce the skills gap we currently face. To do that we have to invest in an education structure capable of developing qualifications, writing the programmes and schemes, sourcing the tutors, colleges and training providers to deliver them. What it boils down to is funding and commitment, without which those that have tried and those that are currently trying to support and promote education for the KBB industry will continue to fail.”

The KBBNTG sadly ran into financial difficulties and a lack of industry support was cited as the cause. Funding is obviously pivotal to the success of every organisation and whilst there were industry partners that loyally supported the NTG financially, such as The Kitchen Bathroom Bedroom Specialists Association (KBSA) and, for a period of time, the Construction Industry Training Board (CITB), Mascari says it was never enough to remain sustainable. “The volume of work required to facilitate, develop, promote and arrange delivery of courses is huge and needs to be paid for.”

Luckily, there are individuals in the industry who, unperturbed by the volume of work required, have stepped up to the plate and taken on the responsibility of forging a clear professional pathway for the industry. In 2014, working in cooperation with industry professionals, Bucks New University launched a new foundation degree course in kitchen design. The part-time course is delivered over three years and has been designed in response to national training needs.

Craig Matson, MD of Roundhouse Design, and Johnny Grey, Founder of Johnny Grey Studios spearheaded the efforts to pull this degree course together, calling on the help of other industry professionals to steer and deliver the training. It was a steep learning curve for all involved, explains Matson: “Education in this country has gone through a lot of changes and the system is still adapting to try to make courses more cost effective, as well as providing students with relevant degrees so that they can be usefully employed once they graduate. The standard of tutor input, the majority of which are from industry, is phenomenally high.”

The development of this degree course has been a hugely beneficial for the image and reputation of the kitchen industry with many welcoming the new framework for a specific, Government-approved, training structure that encourages professionalism.

“The kitchen industry has often been seen as the ‘used car salesman’ of the wider design industry,” says Matson. “In order to be seen as trusted advisors and professional partners, clients or their architects and interior designers need to know that we are professional, with training and expertise. With either government-approved apprenticeships or further education you get a standard that everyone understands and is consistent across the industry.”

Mascari wholeheartedly agrees with Matson on the need for nationally recognised, standardised qualifications. “We have to be responsible for the services we deliver and to that end we have to make sure that we understand good practice, adhere to current compliance etc. Education and Continuing Professional Development (CPD) will teach us that. It is far too risky to think we can just ‘wing’ our way through the job.” 

Grey is adamant that we need to establish a recognition that kitchen design is a profession and sits alongside its educational cousins: lighting design; interior design; product design; and architecture. Matson takes this one step further saying that in an ideal world he would like to see some sort of register, like the RIBA has, which requires CPD points. 

Whilst that may still be a long way off, Mascari believes that what has already been achieved with the degree course is worth celebrating. She says: “This takes kitchen design to a whole new level in terms of spatial design, in-depth research into products, technology, cultural and sustainable practices, such as the benefits of biophilic design and the impact it has on our wellbeing, not to mention our planet. The course also covers the important elements of running your business, project management, sales, customer care and marketing.” 

Whilst the benefits to industry are undeniable, it has not been an easy task to get all the bodies involved in ensuring its success to work together seamlessly. This gap was quickly noticed by Matson and Grey, along with David Gillett, sales and marketing director at Blum, who took it upon themselves to establish the Kitchen Education Trust (TKET), a charitable organisation that provides a link between the kitchen industry and education. TKET was set up in the first year the Foundation Degree in Kitchen Design started at Bucks New University. “It was needed because we were raising funds from the kitchen industry which initially went directly to the university,” says Matson. “However, we found that this did not work to the best effect so, we created TKET to be the intermediary between the education system and the industry, neither of which really understood how the other worked.”

However, Matson says that in order to pursue their goals they need more help from all sectors of the industry. Both Matson and Mascari were involved in the establishment of the Furniture and Interiors Education, Skills and Training Alliance (FIESTA) which unites the key trade associations and affiliates who represent the manufacturers in this sector. “I have always felt that the KBB should have some representation to government and as we fall within the furniture industry footprint, it makes complete sense that by taking a unilateral approach, we stand a much better chance of getting government support when we need it. FIESTA aims to do just that,” explains Mascari.

Whilst so much progress has been made in the past few years, there is still an underlying feeling that support from the wider KBB industry is not as forthcoming as it should be. Grey says that support has been variable, coming mostly from European companies who seem to understand more about the value of training and education. Matson highlights the support they have received from the likes of BSH, Miele, Franke, CD UK, Blanco, LDL, Blum, Cosentino, Decoglaze, Electrolux, Rotpunkt and Swift.

“Most levels in the industry get it,” assures Matson. “They think it’s a good idea, but getting them to translate that into financial support, which is predominantly what we need, is sometimes more difficult.”

For Grey, one of the main challenges is convincing the big players and the smaller retail businesses that they will benefit from educating their workforce. This has been clearly demonstrated by the poor uptake of installation apprenticeships. “Having developed the Fitted Furniture Installer Apprenticeship some 14 years ago and several reviews of the national occupational standards since then, the uptake has been terrible,” states Mascari.

“Our industry is crying out for qualified installers, there has been an apprenticeship available for some years and still we are not getting installation apprentices through our colleges. Colleges and training providers have been set up and are waiting for the uptake, but as we know, an apprentice needs to be employed by someone in order to take up an apprenticeship so why is our industry not doing just that? Hairdressers take on apprentices, manufacturers take on apprentices, so how can we complain that we have a skills shortage when we are not prepared to support and invest in an education programme?”

More recently, approval for the level 3 apprenticeship for the fitted furniture design technician has been approved and is now awaiting final government sign off. Once this apprenticeship is available, companies will be able to take on a kitchen design apprentice who can then go on to do the foundation degree course if they wished to take their studies further. The hope is that there will eventually be a BA and MA in kitchen design and a post-graduate research offering.

But none of this can achieved without the engagement of the industry. Matson says: “We need further assistance as we broaden the objectives of education and training for the industry, so I would urge all of those companies who have a great offering or product and are making a good living out of the industry, to consider their corporate responsibility and how they can help.”

Mascari sums it up nicely when she quotes American politician Brad Henry: “No other investment yields as great a return as the investment in education. An educated workforce is the foundation of every community and the future of every economy.”

Support Systems

As part of Blum’s corporate responsibility and commitment to improved professionalism within the industry, it offers a scholarship to cover part of the tuition fee cost to send a student on the Foundation Degree Course in Kitchen Design. Blum has offered a bursary since the first course started in 2014, and has supported a student every year since.

Originally, Blum sent one of its own employees, Thomas Winfield, on the three-year course. Having graduated in 2017, he now works at Blum’s UK headquarters in Milton Keynes. He says: “Completing the Kitchen Design Degree has really helped me with the work I do in the Blum Experience Centre, which is our dedicated consumer ‘test drive’ room.

Tom Winfield

“Being able to discuss with visitors their requirements in more detail, and to think differently in interpreting the space they have for their dream kitchen, has really elevated the customer experience. I really enjoyed the course, and being exposed to the many different sides of design thinking.”

However, Blum also has its own in-house, award-winning apprenticeship scheme. It was the first in Austria starting in 1959, and it is also one of the biggest with 384 people taking part as of September 2019. The course lasts three and a half to four years, depending on the chosen route, and apprentices will spend six months learning basic skills before being split into various high-tech career paths.

With a retention rate currently between 60-70%, the benefits for Blum are clear. Not only does the apprenticeship scheme provide a steady flow of high-skilled technicians and mechanics, it also ensures its long-term planning targets and the continuation of know-how and experience inside of the company.

A New Way of Learning

Gira is a supplier of intelligent system solutions for electronic, networked digital building control systems. Organisational knowledge sharing at Gira is achieved through the Gira Academy, which offers employees the opportunity to customise their own individualised training through face-to-face seminars, webinars and web-based training.

Mark Booth

Mark Booth, Managing Director Gira UK, says: “Ongoing learning is crucial for not falling behind. This is particularly true in the electrical and KBB sectors as contemporary methods, changing markets and new business fields and regulations make it necessary to constantly be up-to-date.”

Pledge of Allegiance

“Our main aim for pledging support to TKET is to help propel the kitchen industry into a true ‘profession of the highest integrity and competence’,” says Matt Phillips, Head of UK Operations for Rotpunkt. “We all know that kitchens are a multi-million pound global industry. It is therefore imperative for you to be able to maximise your share of that industry with a highly skilled and knowledgeable workforce able to understand your clients’ needs, design trends and technological developments.”

Matt Phillips, Head of UK Operations, Rotpunkt UK

He adds: “Additionally, skills shortages are putting significant pressure on the kitchen industry and TKET is successfully helping to maintain a high level of student enrolment and thus, market enrichment from the next generation of kitchen designers that will ultimately help to shape our future.”

“It is vital for our industry to work together and encourage fresh thinking that offers a new perspective and/or approach to kitchen design in general. We want our furniture to be ‘defined by difference’ so retailers and specifiers of Rotpunkt kitchens have the power of possibilities. This can only happen if we protect the entry level phase of our industry and the education of succeeding generations.”

On the Job Training

Chris Woodward is lead designer at Wren Kitchens but he had no experience in kitchen design before joining the company.  “I was manager of a bowling alley part-time whilst studying sports coaching at university,” says Woodward. “A friend of mine recommended a job at Wren based on the fact that I work well with customers. It seemed like a great opportunity as they offered on the job training. When I first joined, there was a week-long training programme which consisted of in-store training and online learning. Since I started there has been a continuous programme of learning and training. We have a lot of support in-house so if we ever have a skills shortage we can always find someone in-house to help with upskilling.”

Chris Woodward, Wren Kitchens

Conor Laville, Head of Training at Wren explains: “We always focus on the experience of the end user so it’s important that our staff are well educated in regulations because the impact that you could have on a customer’s home is substantial. We need to ensure that we pass all that experience, knowledge and training onto our designers. Training is essential to our business as we expand.”

Wren built its training academy in 2013. “We initially offered a one week course, which turned into a four week on-boarding programme and it is about to extend to a 6-12 month programme,” says Laville. “We are in the process of building more training centres around the UK so we can roll this out nationally to ensure we have the facilities to train our designers. Throughout their first year we also have a fantastic webinar programme to increase the access we offer to our training programmes.”

Vocational Training

“As someone who’s been through the apprentice career route first hand, I am an advocate of this process,” explains Paul Pickford, Director of Innovation, Product and Marketing at Aqualisa. “I started my apprenticeship in engineering at age 16 and embarked on a four year course that led on to a part-time degree. This blend of education and on the job training gave me a vital understanding of both the manufacturing process with hands-on training and the occupational elements of this career.

“Apprenticeships are crucial for amending the current skills shortage in the UK and introducing young people to the benefits a trade-based career can offer. Apprenticeships are a gateway to work with better potential for post-education employment than many other non-vocational routes.”

Paul Pickford – Aqualisa

Staff Scholarships

Over the last two years, Cosentino has provided one of its Elite Studios a 50% scholarship to send a member of staff on the award-winning foundation degree course in Kitchen Design at Bucks New University.

Paul Gidley, Cosentino UK, Area Director

Paul Gidley, Area Director for Cosentino UK, says: “At Cosentino, we are committed to supporting our industry and nurturing upcoming talent. We are delighted to be supporting individuals further their education and their careers through The Kitchen Education Trust with a 50% scholarship on the prestigious Bucks New University course. We are indebted to our loyal network of kitchen studios, and are happy to be able to give back when we can.”

DESIGNER KITCHEN & BATHROOM MAGAZINE HAS GONE GREEN!

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